Sunday, September 21, 2014

Open Access Journal: Akroterion: Journal for the Classics in South Africa. Tydskrif vir die Klassieke in Suid-Afrika

Akroterion: Journal for the Classics in South Africa. Tydskrif vir die Klassieke in Suid-Afrika
ISSN 2079-2883 (online)
ISSN 0303-1896 (print)
http://akroterion.journals.ac.za/public/journals/1/homeHeaderTitleImage_en_US.png
Akroterion welcomes scholarly contributions on all aspects of Greek and Roman civilization. Preference is given to articles that will also appeal to the non-specialist. We particularly encourage submission of articles dealing with the influence and reception of the Classics.























1990



Open Access Journal: Iberia-Kolxetʻi : Sakʻartʻvelos klasikuri da adremedievuri periodis arkʻeologiur-istoriuli kvlevani = Iberia-Colchis : researches on the archeology and history of Georgia in the classical and early medieval period

Iberia-Kolxetʻi : Sakʻartʻvelos klasikuri da adremedievuri periodis arkʻeologiur-istoriuli kvlevani = Iberia-Colchis : researches on the archeology and history of Georgia in the classical and early medieval period
ISSN: 1512-4207
Iberia-Colchis იბერია-კოლხეთი (Researches on the Archaeology and History of Georgia in the Classical and Early Medieval Period)

C’est une revue géorgienne consacré à l’archéologie et l’histoire anciennes et médiévales de la Géorgie. [Description from here]

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Open Access Journal: Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies

 [First posted in AWOL 13 February 2010. Updated 20 September 2014]

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies
http://hortulusjournal.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/cropped-header-1.jpg

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a multidisciplinary refereed postgraduate journal devoted to the literatures, cultures, and ideas of the medieval world. Published electronically twice a year, its mission is to present a forum in which graduate students from around the globe may share their work.
Hortulus has an open submission policy, so submissions are accepted throughout the year. Graduate students are welcome to submit previously unpublished articles that challenge our readers to look at the Middle Ages from a variety of perspectives by engaging in new theories and interdisciplinary research. All articles should be submitted via email; submission guidelines can be found here.
We publish a themed issue each spring, and a general issue each autumn. Calls for papers for each issue can be found on the main page of the website. There are also various position openings in Hortulus throughout the year so watch our social media outlets for information.





Perseus: Announcing the Arethusa Annotation Framework

Announcing the Arethusa Annotation Framework
Developers Gernot Höflechner, Robert Lichtensteiner and Christof Sirk, in collaboration with the Perseus Digital Library at Tufts (via the Libraries and the Transformation of the Humanities and Perseids projects) and the University of Leipzig’s Open Philology Project, have released Arethusa, a framework for linguistic annotation and curation. Arethusa was inspired by and extends the goals of the Alpheios Project, to provide a highly configurable, language-independent, extensible infrastructure for close-reading, annotation, curation and exploration of open-access digitized texts. While the initial release highlights support for morpho-syntactic annotation, Arethusa is designed to allow users to switch seamlessly between a variety of annotation and close-reading activities, facilitating the creation of sharable, reusable linguistic data in collaborative research and pedagogical environments.
grid
Arethusa is built on the angular.js javascript web application framework and provides a back-end independent infrastructure for accessing texts, annotations and linguistic services from a variety of sources. Extensibility is a guiding design goal — Arethusa includes tools for automatic generation of skeleton code for new features as plugins; detailed development guides are also currently in progress. We hope others will be able to reuse and build upon the platform to add support for other annotation types, languages and back-end repositories and workflow engines.
Arethusa is already deployed as a component of the Perseids platform, where it provides an annotation interface for morpho-syntactic analyses and will soon also act as a broker between the Perseids back-end (the Son of SUDA Online application) and various other front-end annotating and editing activities, including translation alignments, entity identification and text editing.
Screencasts are available that show how the Arethusa application can be used for syntactic diagram (treebank) and morphological analysis annotations on Perseids. Additional demos and slides will be made available soon which highlight additional features along with the architecture and design.
This project has been made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (Award LG0611032611), the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the European Social Fund. We also are indebted to Robert Gorman and Vanessa Gorman of the University of Nebrask and Giuseppe G. A. Celano of the University of Leipzig for their invaluable contributions to the design and testing of the platform.

Friday, September 19, 2014

Digital Humanities and the Ancient World

Digital Humanities and the Ancient World
Biblical Archaeology Society Staff   •  08/13/2014
What would happen if the Pope’s library were accidentally burnt? How can we reconstruct and visualize ancient and medieval pilgrimage routes? Technology is changing the way we study and preserve texts and artifacts. In a series of web-exclusive articles written by scholars engaged in the Digital Humanities, learn how this growing field of study is helping to analyze textual and archaeological data—and how you can help.
 


 

Digital Humanities: An Introduction

Jewish-Iraqi-manuscriptsWhat if the Dead Sea Scrolls were damaged? What if the Pope’s library burned down? In “Digital Humanities: How Everyone Can Get a Library Card to the World’s Most Exclusive Collections Online,” George Washington University associate professor of history Diane H. Cline explores the research opportunities and potential impact of Digital Humanities projects. This new field not only preserves publications, it extends access to the humanities to anyone with Internet access.
Read “Digital Humanities: How Everyone Can Get a Library Card to the World’s Most Exclusive Collections Online” by Diane H. Cline >>
 


 

Mapping Technologies

pleiades-stoa-orgWant to follow a fourth-century pilgrim itinerary from Bordeaux via Constantinople to the Holy Land? Experiment with ancient travel times and their costs over land, sea and sand in the Roman Empire? University of Iowa assistant professor of classics Sarah E. Bond explains in “Map Quests: Geography, Digital Humanities and the Ancient World” how the Digital Humanities offers opportunities to explore, interact with and contribute to maps of the ancient world.
Read “Map Quests: Geography, Digital Humanities and the Ancient World” by Sarah E. Bond >>
 


 

Open Access to Digital Data

Open-Context-1Interested in exploring the results of archaeology projects directly from the researchers? Cutting-edge technology is helping archaeologists generate a tremendous amount of digital data each year. At the same time, the scientific community increasingly expects direct access to the data. In “Open Context: Making the Most of Archaeological Data,” Alexandria Archive Institute cofounders Sarah Whitcher Kansa and Eric Kansa describe Open Context, an open access, peer-reviewed data publishing service that has published over one million digital resources, from archaeological survey data to excavation documentation and artifact analyses.
Read “Open Context: Making the Most of Archaeological Data” by Sarah Whitcher Kansa and Eric Kansa >>
 


 

Making University Collections Accessible to All

CNERS-tabletMany university departments across the world have shelves and storerooms full of books, artifacts and research collected over several decades. What do you do when the “skeletons in your closet” are a box of 2,000-year-old artifacts? That was the question facing the University of British Columbia’s Department of Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies. In “From Stone to Screen: Bringing 21st-Century Access to Ancient Artifacts,” members of the From Stone to Screen graduate student project at UBC discuss their ongoing efforts to create digital archives of their department’s artifact collection—making these fascinating objects accessible to a global audience online.
Read “From Stone to Screen: Bringing 21st-Century Access to Ancient Artifacts” >>
 

Open Access Journal: Vjesnik Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu - Journal of the Zagreb Archaeological Museum

[First posted in AWOL 10 August 2010. Updated 19 September 2014]

Vjesnik Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu - Journal of the Zagreb Archaeological Museum
ISSN: 0350-7165
http://hrcak.srce.hr/logo/168.jpg
Vjesnik Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu objavljuje znanstvene i stručne radove koji obrađuju širok raspon tema iz područja pretpovijesne, antičke i srednjovjekovne arheologije te arheologiji srodnih i komplementarnih znanstvenih grana. Serije: 1. tzv. "nulta serija" pod imenom Viestnik Narodnoga zamaljskoga muzeja u Zagrebu (1870-1876.); 2. Viestnik Hrvatskoga arkeologičkoga družtva (1879-1892.); 3. Vjesnik Hrvatskoga arheološkoga društva, nova serija (1895-1941/1942.); 4. Vjesnik Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu (1958-).

The Journal of the Zagreb Archaeological Museum publishes scientific and professional papers which cover broad range of topics in prehistorical, classical and medieval archaeology. Journal series: 1. Viestnik Narodnoga zamaljskoga muzeja u Zagrebu (1870-1876.); 2. Viestnik Hrvatskoga arkeologičkoga družtva (1879-1892.); 3. Vjesnik Hrvatskoga arheološkoga društva, nova serija (1895-1941/1942.); 4. Vjesnik Arheološkog muzeja u Zagrebu (1958-).

2014  
  Vol. 46   No. 1
2012  
  Vol. 45   No. 1
2011  
  Vol. 44   No. 1
2010  
  Vol. 43   No. 1
2009  
  Vol. 42   No. 1
2008  
  Vol. 41   No. 1
2007  
  Vol. 40   No. 1
2006  
  Vol. 39   No. 1
2005  
  Vol. 38   No. 1
2004  
  Vol. 37   No. 1
2003  
  Vol. 36   No. 1
2002  
  Vol. 35   No. 1
2001  
  Vol. 34   No. 1
1999  
  Vol. 32-33   No. 1
1997  
  Vol. 30-31   No. 1
1995  
  Vol. 28-29   No. 1
1994  
  Vol. 26-27   No. 1
1992  
  Vol. 24-25   No. 1
1990  
  Vol. 23   No. 1
1989  
  Vol. 22   No. 1
1988  
  Vol. 21   No. 1
1987  
  Vol. 20   No. 1
1986  
  Vol. 19   No. 1
1985  
  Vol. 18   No. 1
1983  
  Vol. 16-17   No. 1
1982  
  Vol. 15   No. 1
1981  
  Vol. 14   No. 1
1979  
  Vol. 12-13   No. 1
1977  
  Vol. 10-11   No. 1
1975  
  Vol. 9   No. 1
1974  
  Vol. 8   No. 1
1972  
  Vol. 6-7   No. 1
1971  
  Vol. 5   No. 1
1970  
  Vol. 4   No. 1
1968  
  Vol. 3   No. 1
1961  
  Vol. 2   No. 1
1958  
  Vol. 1   No. 1
1944  
  Vol. 24-25   No. 1
1942  
  Vol. 22-23   No. 1
1936  
  Vol. 17   No. 1
1935  
  Vol. 16   No. 1
1928  
  Vol. 15   No. 1
1919  
  Vol. 14   No. 1
1914  
  Vol. 13   No. 1
1912  
  Vol. 12   No. 1
1911  
  Vol. 11   No. 1
1909  
  Vol. 10   No. 1
1907  
  Vol. 9   No. 1
1905  
  Vol. 8   No. 1
1904  
  Vol. 7   No. 1
1902  
  Vol. 6   No. 1
1901  
  Vol. 5   No. 1
1900  
  Vol. 4   No. 1
1898  
  Vol. 3   No. 1
1897  
  Vol. 2   No. 1
1895  
  Vol. 1   No. 1
1892  
  Vol. 14   No. 1
1891  
  Vol. 13   No. 1
1890  
  Vol. 12   No. 1
1889  
  Vol. 11   No. 1
1888  
  Vol. 10   No. 1
1887  
  Vol. 9   No. 1
1886  
  Vol. 8   No. 1
1885  
  Vol. 7   No. 1
1884  
  Vol. 6   No. 1
1883  
  Vol. 5   No. 1
1882  
  Vol. 4   No. 1
1881  
  Vol. 3   No. 1
1880  
  Vol. 2   No. 1
1879  
  Vol. 1   No. 1
1876  
  Vol. 2   No. 1
1870  
  Vol. 1   No. 1

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Digitales Forum Romanum

Digitales Forum Romanum
http://www.digitales-forum-romanum.de/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Phase-L_Viewpoint-BeckOst13-760x338.jpg
Forschungs- & Lehrprojekt des Winckelmann-Instituts der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
in Kooperation mit dem Exzellenzcluster TOPOI


Das antike Forum Romanum gehört zu den Hauptattraktionen eines jeden Rombesuchs. Täglich erkunden hunderte von Besuchern das Forum Romanum und lassen sich von der stimmungsvollen Ruinenlandschaft und der historischen Bedeutung dieses Ortes faszinieren: Hier lag das öffentlich-politische Zentrum der antiken Metropole, hier wurde Politik gemacht und Geschichte geschrieben – und entsprechend pulsiert hier für uns heutzutage die Vergangenheit des antiken Roms in einer ganz besonderen Intensität. Doch angesichts der idyllischen Ruinenlandschaft, als welche sich die Ausgrabungsstätte heutzutage präsentiert, fällt es schwer, sich ein wirkliches Bild von diesem antiken Platz zu machen: Wie erlebten ihn die Menschen in der Antike, wie präsentierte er sich als Bühne des politischen Handelns und der gesellschaftlichen Kommunikation, und wie funktionierte er überhaupt konkret als öffentliches Zentrum dieser einzigartigen antiken Metropole? Es sind diese Fragen, mit denen die Ausgrabungsstätte ihre Besucher oftmals alleine lässt. Und es sind die Fragen, auf die wiederum die Klassische Archäologie seit jeher mit Hilfe von Rekonstruktionen Antworten zu geben versucht.

  • Start


  • Forum Romanum
  • Projekt
  • Ressourcen
  • Multimedia
  • Kontakt

  •