Sunday, September 24, 2017

American Journal of Archaeology Open Access Content

[First posted in AWOL 21 October 2011. Updated 24 September 2017]

American Journal of Archaeology Open Access Content

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Online-Only Published Content

The following online-only published content is freely available electronically immediately upon publication and can be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (CC BY-NC). This license allows anyone to reuse, remix, and build upon the content, as long as it is for legal, noncommercial purposes; the new work must credit the author, the AJA, and the Archaeological Institute of America.
Book Reviews (2006–present)
Books Received (2010–present)
Review Articles (2006–present)
Museum Reviews (2006–present)
Necrologies (2013–present)
Volume Indexes (2012–present)
Supplementary Content (2006–present)

Print-Published Content Available Online

The following print-published content is freely available electronically immediately upon publication and can be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License (CC BY-NC-ND). This license allows anyone to download the content and share it with others, as long as it is for legal, noncommercial purposes; the content cannot be changed in any way, and the AJA and the Archaeological Institute of America must be credited as the rightsholder.
Editorials (2004–present)
AIA Awards (2003–2015)
Volume Indexes (1897–2011)
Additional print-published content is freely available electronically immediately upon publication and can also be distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License (CC BY-NC-ND).

Green Open Access

The AJA also supports green open access, or self-archiving. Authors may post a copy of their e-print, or final paginated version published in the journal, in their funding agency’s or institution’s secure digital repository. Any reuse should include an acknowledgment to the AJA and the Archaeological Institute of America and a link to the version of record on JSTOR. Authors should not post the pre-print (original manuscript before peer review and editing) or the post-print (final accepted version; i.e., after peer-review but without AJA editing and typesetting).

Non-Affiliated Repositories

Only the abstract and a link to the version of record on JSTOR should be posted in an institutional repository not affiliated with the AJA author.

Additional Free Content

Download all AJA content published before 1923. See a full list on the AJA Archive.
Read articles online through JSTOR’s Register and Read service. Register and Read does not include access to AJA Current Content, which runs from 2003 to the present.

The Anatolian Roads Project

The Anatolian Roads Project
The Anatolian Roads Project
This site is dedicated to research in the field of the Roman road system located in ancient Anatolia, present-day Turkey. The site is sponsored by the History department of Wisconsin Lutheran College under the direction of Dr. Glen L. Thompson and by the Asia Minor Research Center under the direction of Dr. Mark Wilson. The Anatolian Roads Project (TARP) is a work in progress and thus will be updated and improved as time goes on.

Anatolian Atlas

Anatolian Atlas
The Anatolian Atlas is a resource for scholars interested in the archaeological settlement patterning and historical geography of Ancient Anatolia (modern day Turkey).      
        
Here you will find Google Maps that display the extents of various archaeological surveys that have been conducted in Anatolia as well as numerous archaeological sites. These sites, when possible, are linked to online content that provides more information. They also often have citations for scholarly work that has discussed them. The works that are cited can be found in the bibliography.

Finally, the Anatolian Atlas also hosts original research that has been developed in CAMEL by scholars of the Oriental Institute.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Syntacticus: A treebank of early Indo-European languages

Syntacticus: A treebank of early Indo-European languages
Syntacticus provides easy access to around a million morphosyntactically annotated sentences from a range of early Indo-European languages.
Syntacticus is an umbrella project for the PROIEL Treebank, the TOROT Treebank and the ISWOC Treebank, which all use the same annotation system and share similar linguistic priorities. In total, Syntacticus contains 80,138 sentences or 936,874 tokens in 10 languages.
We are constantly adding new material to Syntacticus. The ultimate goal is to have a representative sample of different text types from each branch of early Indo-European. We maintain lists of texts we are working on at the moment, which you can find on the PROIEL Treebank and the TOROT Treebank pages, but this is extremely time-consuming work so please be patient!
The focus for Syntacticus at the moment is to consolidate and edit our documentation so that it is easier to approach. We are very aware that the current documentation is inadequate! But new features and better integration with our development toolchain are also on the horizon in the near future.
Language Size
Ancient Greek 250,449 tokens
Latin 202,140 tokens
Classical Armenian 23,513 tokens
Gothic 57,211 tokens
Portuguese 36,595 tokens
Spanish 54,661 tokens
Old English 29,406 tokens
Old French 2,340 tokens
Old Russian 209,334 tokens
Old Church Slavonic 71,225 tokens

Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl)

 [First posted in AWOL  20 January 2011. Updated 23 September 2017]

Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl)

THE CATALOGUS

The Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum (CPhCl) provides a reference tool for all those who study greek and latin antiquity, specifically useful for studies on the history of classical scholarship in the modern age. It is an encyclopaedic lexicon collecting the bio-bibliographical data about classical philologists and it is a continuation and improvement of W. Pökel’s Philologisches Schriftstellerlexikon, Leipzig 1882. Only deceased scholars are included.

THE HISTORY OF THE CATALOGUS

The Catalogus started off with the 1984 CNR international conference "La filologia classica nel secolo XX" (strongly supported by Scevola Mariotti) and with its proceedings, published in Pisa in 1989. Subsequently the preparation of a Catalogus Philologorum Classicorum has begun at the Dipartimento di Filologia Classica of the University of Pisa, with the financial support of CNR, and has been on-line since 2003, within the web-site Aristarchus, thanks to a cooperation between the Dipartimento di Filologia Classica of the University of Pisa and the Dipartimento di Archeologia e Filologia Classica (D.AR.FI.CL.ET.) of the University of Genoa.

THE CATALOGUS TODAY

The CPhCl has become an international network since 2009. The central unit, which has its head office at the Dipartimento di Archeologia e Filologia Classica of the University of Genoa, is responsible for the coordination and supervision of the whole project, as well as the administration of the website. The cards concerning the scholars have been attributed to the local units according to geographic and linguistic criteria. A three-letter abbreviation identifies the country of the unit which is responsible for each card.

For specific information about the cards you can write an e-mail to the relevant unit, provided it has started its activity. Since CPhCl is a work in progress the units are continually developing their competence and skills. In the meantime you can write an e-mail to the central unit about the whole project or about cards that have not yet been attributed to a specific unit.

You should be aware that mistakes and shortcomings of various kinds are inevitable at this stage: we are sorry for them and very grateful for any suggestion on your part.

To display a file example click here
  • Total cards: 7428
  • Available cards: 902
  • Programmed cards: 6526
  • Last update: 13/09/2017

The CRANE Project: Computational Research on the Ancient Near East Project

[First posted in AWOL 13 December 2013, updated 23 September 2017]

The CRANE Project: Computational Research on the Ancient Near East Project
http://www.crane.utoronto.ca/images/crane.png

CRANE (Computational Research on the Ancient Near East) is an international and interdisciplinary research project that is changing our understanding of archaeology in the Near East.

Over 150 years of research – where humans developed agriculture,  interregional trade, the first sedentary communities, state-level societies and political networks – has resulted in a huge amount of complex and interrelated data ranging from settlement patterns to ceramics.